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Bob Stumpel

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Poster for Ray Charles' Vega releases: "Celui que l'Amérique appelle 'Le Génie'. Poster design a/o illustration by Jean-Claude Trambouze, 1961. $700 at Ebay.

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Bob Stumpel

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The Ray Charles Orchestra at the Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta on July 26, 1996 - shortly after the bomb scare. Photo by Jill Kettles(?).

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Bob Stumpel

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Ray Charles (and David Fathead Newman) in Amsterdam, on May 11, 1963. Photo by Hans Sabel or Henk Daniëls.

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Bob Stumpel

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#statue, #woman*, #goddess?*, #doll?, #pubic triangle, #bone. #600CE - #800CE. #Egypt, #Coptic? #12,8 x 3,7 cm. The British Museum. Anachronistic!* Doll; hollow bone; tubular with pierced shoulders; incised facial features and grooved lines around the neck and stomach; top and back of skull covered with a bitumenous substance to resemble hair.

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Bob Stumpel

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Ray Charles at the Leverone Fieldhouse of Dartmouth College in Hannover (NH) on October 12, ?1968.

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Bob Stumpel

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Shanghai Camping Inflatable clear air bubble dome tent.

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#statue (dice), #woman, #goddess, #Baubo, #hairdo, #squatting, #steatopygous #thighs, #buttocks, #slit?, #bronze. #0CE - #200CE. #Italy, #Rome. British Museum.

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Bactria-Margiana, c. late 3rd - early 2nd millennium BC. ...carved from a single stone with incised decoration and 10K gilding on the hands. Head is marble with lapis lazuli head dress. h: 22.5 cm. ...

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Image 2: Bactrian Figurine, c. Late 3rd - Early 2nd millennium BCE. Such composite statuettes form a class of unique objects that are specific to part of the western Central Asia civilization. They come from a very wide area ranging from Margiana (modern day Turkmenistan) to Pakistan, with a large concentration in Bactria (modern Afghanistan and Tajikistan).

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Fertility Goddess, 100s (?) Pakistan, Gandhara, Charsadda, early Kushan Period (1st century-320)Terracotta. h:26.70 cm (h:10 ½ inches)> bernardperroud.com

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The Earliest Printing was Stamped into Soft Clay in Mesopotamia (Circa 2,291 BCE – 2,254 BCE)

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Ray Charles in concert at Avery Fisher Hall in New York City on July 2, 1997. Photo by Andrew Savulich.

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A Palestinian Mother Smiling with her child in her arms in 1920 - Taken By Khalil Raad

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Bob Stumpel

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Mother Goddess (Matrika) Post-Gupta period, mid- 6th century, India. One of a group of 7 mother goddesses sprung from a Hindu male god. Despite their beauty, matrikas represent dangerous and malevolent forces—the devourers of children and bearers of sickness and disease. Though integral to early temple iconography, their power was so threatening they were marginalized, consigned to shrines beyond city boundaries. Their combined power is understood to be embodied in the mother goddess, Durga.

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The Venus of Menton, one of the Grimaldi Venuses

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Snake Goddess, a famous Polychrome clay statue from the late Minoan period (about 1600 B.C.)

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Neolithic Triangular Figurine, > 3500 BCE, Anatolian, Neolithic, Syrian. Hardly more than a modeled pebble, but one can easily distinguish the silhouette of a seated human figure which is certainly a simplified form of the "Mother Goddess." Carved from a small stone to which the sculptor gave a triangular and slightly thick shape, as if it were a steatopygic figure ("of large buttocks") in relief, but sculpted from all sides.

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Bob Stumpel

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Poster for Ray Charles' Vega releases: "Celui que l'Amérique appelle 'Le Génie'. Poster design a/o illustration by Jean-Claude Trambouze, 1961. $700 at Ebay.

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#statue, #girl, #dancer, #doll, #jointed, #terracotta. #350BCE. #Greece. #Castanets.

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Ray Charles and David Fathead Newman in Amsterdam (at the airport or a hotel?), on May 11, 1963. Photo by Hans Sabel or Henk Daniëls. That night "[a]t first, the 12,000-strong audience remained seated, listening politely, but Charles soon had everyone on their feet and whipped into such a state of excitement that some tried to clamber up onto the stage. The organisers panicked and got Ray Charles off the stage immediately, thereby ending the show."

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#statue, #mother #goddess, #child, #sitting, #throne. #Gaulish, #England. #100CE - #200CE. #Pipeclay.

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Ray Charles at the Leverone Fieldhouse of Dartmouth College in Hannover (NH) on October 12, ?1968.

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#statue, #woman, #goddess, squatting?*, #giant #face, #steatopygous #thighs, #buttocks. #4000BCE - #3400BCE. #Sardinia, #Cagliari, #Cabras Oristano. Museo Archeologico Nazionale. Sea god.

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#statue, #woman?, #eye #goddes?*, #striped, #gypsum. #3700BCE - #3500BCE. #Syria, #Tell Brak. Metropolitan Museum.

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PRINCESSE DE BACTRIANE. Statuette représentant une femme assise, vêtue d'une importante jupe de kaunakès échancrée et formée de longues mèches en V striées. Elle pose ses bras sur les genoux. La tête stylisée, au nez proéminent, présente une coiffure en côtes de melon se terminant en une large nappe striée. Dos plat et lisse. Chlorite verte (corps) et noire (coiffure) et calcite blanche (tête et bras). Asie occidentale, Âge du bronze, ca. 2000-1900 av. J.-C.

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PRINCESSE DE BACTRIANE. Statuette représentant une femme assise, vêtue d'une importante jupe de kaunakès échancrée et formée de longues mèches striées. Elle pose ses bras sur les genoux. La tête stylisée présente une coiffure finement striée formant un bandeau. Chlorite verte (corps et coiffure) et Calcite blanche (tête et mains). Bouchages. Asie occidentale, Âge du bronze, ca. 2000-1900 av. J.-C.

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Enrico Caruso, Italian tenor, c.1913.

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Ray Charles in concert at Avery Fisher Hall in New York City on July 2, 1997. Photo by Andrew Savulich.

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Female Fertility Figurine Egypt, Second Intermediate Period (1640 - 1532 BCE)

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Síle na Gig are stone carvings found on the walls of churches and castles of Ireland. They depict ugly, old, 2- to 5- breasted women, with oversized genitals. There are many theories what Síle na Gig mean, but no one knows exactly what they symbolize.

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2600-2400 BC Chlorite Vessel inscribed "Inanna and the Serpent" a battle between a leopard and a spotted serpent in low relief. Mother of pearl and stone were inset to form the eyes and the spots, both creatures' mouths are painted red. The feline cult animal represents Inanna (as well as her Semitic counterpart, Ishtar). Sumerian Temple of Inanna, the chief goddess of the temple city of Nippur. Iraq Museum, Baghdad, Iraq

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Asherah was the name of a Canaanite goddess. Part of the Canaanite pantheon, she became in Semitic mythology, a mother goddess. Her name is attested to in a number of ancient Near Eastern sources including the Khirbet el-Qom and Kuntillet Ajrud inscriptions, where the phrase ‘YHVH (and) his asherah’ is detected. The Bible mentions her at least forty times.

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Clay Bird Diety Statuette of a Woman, Egypt, Predynastic, before 3000 BCE. Credit Line: Werner Forman Archive/ British Museum, London

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The Ray Charles Orchestra at the Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta on July 26, 1996 - shortly after the bomb scare. Photo by Jill Kettles(?).

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#plaque, #woman, #goddess, #lady of the beasts, #sitting, #birth position, #snakes. #300CE - #400CE. #Sweden, #Viking.

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#statue, #woman, #snake* #goddess, #pubic #triangle, #standing, #snake* #child, #terracotta. #4500BCE. #Ubaid culture, #Mesopotamia, #Iraq, #Ur.

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Terracotta figurine with articulated arms and legs, early 5th century b.c. Greek, Corinthian Rogers Fund, 1944 (44.11.8)These figurines are too fragile to have been play things. Moreover, they are frequently found in sanctuaries where they were brought as votive gifts to the gods. They were found in both adult and children's graves.

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Pakistan - ca. 3rd century BC (pre-Mauryan)

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#statue, #woman, #goddess, #Baubo, #squatting, #bronze. #0CE - #100CE. #Egypt, #Ptolemaic.

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Statuette féminine connue sous l’appellation de «princesse de Bactriane». Très différente et très ancienne aussi, cette figure représente une dame de l’aristocratie dans la civilisation de l’Oxus, en Asie centrale. (Musée Barbier-Mueller/Studio Ferrazzini Bouchet)

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Bactrian Figurine, Gonur Depe, Turkmenistan

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Bactrian statue of woman from an auction at Christie's. Bactrian female figure with a huge pleated dress. It comes from Bactria-Margiana and is dated Late 3rd-Early 2nd Millennium B.C. It is 7 1/4 inches high. The "shelf" at the west was for the now missing, separately made forearms. The dress, which is similar to some on some Sumerian figures, is made of chlorite and the face is white limestone. There is a closely related work in the Louvre.

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B.B.King, John Lee Hooker, and Willie Dixon at the China Club in LA on June 29, 1991.

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Africa | Fertility doll from the Namchi (Namji) people of Cameroon | Wood, glass beads, cowrie shells, leather and seeds

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Asherah - Canaanite fertility goddess and the wooden cult symbol that represented her. She is the consort of El in the Ugaritic texts.

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Three European Venus figurines from the ice-age of ca. 25,000 years ago. From left to right: Venus of Dolni-Vestonice, Czech, burnt clay. Venus of Willendorf, Austria, Chalk. Venus of Lespugue, France, mammoth ivory.

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The ca. 8,000 year old Seated Woman of Çatalhöyük #archaeology Turkey Generally thought to depict a Mother Goddess Embedded image permalink

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Japanese ceramic figurine "DOGU". No face dogu. Aichi Japan. BC.2,500 - BC.1,200.

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