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Checking out the old South Ferry station before it closes forever Last Saturday, 18 March 2017, I went to check out the old South Ferry subway station, the southernmost station in Manhattan.

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Another #TBT: Almost the same view, from the @LondonEye, July 2004. #Westminster #London #LDN #WeAreNotAfraid (at Palace of Westminster)

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Looking east down 14th Street in Manhattan from the High Line. #🗽 (at The High Line)

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Vintage 1905 decorative tiles at the old South Ferry subway station, the southernmost subway station in Manhattan. This station closed in 2009 after a new South Ferry station opened. It was then reopened after the new station was severely damaged in hurricane Sandy in 2012. But repair work on the new station is nearly complete and it should reopen in June. Since the station is being fortified against future flooding, once it reopens this one may never be seen again, so I wanted to check it out before it's​ closed for good. (at South Ferry Subway Station)

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Receiving the call

A journal entry from the month I received my mission call reveals the mixed emotions of that day—and the Spirit’s confirmation that I was going where the Lord wanted me to go.<img width="203" height="300" style="float: right; padding:10px;" src="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2000/11/0064210-r7-035-16.jpg?w=203" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2000/11/0064210-r7-035-16.jpg?w=203 203w, https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2000/11/0064210-r7-035-16.jpg?w=406 406w, https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2000/11/0064210-r7-035-16.jpg?w=101 101w" sizes="(max-width: 203px) 100vw, 203px" data-attachment-id="126562" data-permalink="http://dialann.org/?attachment_id=126562" data-orig-file="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2000/11/0064210-r7-035-16.jpg" data-orig-size="1215,1800" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta='{"aperture":"0","credit":"","camera":"","caption":"","created_timestamp":"0","copyright":"","focal_length":"0","iso":"0","shutter_speed":"0","title":"","orientation":"0"}' data-image-title="Dustin at the Missionary Training Center, Provo, Utah, 17 January 2001" data-image-description="<p>17 January 2001</p> " data-medium-file="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2000/11/0064210-r7-035-16.jpg?w=203" data-large-file="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2000/11/0064210-r7-035-16.jpg?w=691">A journal entry from the month I received my mission call reveals the mixed emotions of that day—and the Spirit’s confirmation that I was going where the Lord wanted me to go. It is with a little trepidation that I print this. Becoming reacquainted with your younger self is often an embarrassing experience as you grimace at your bravado, naïveté, and know-it-all nature. Some of the worst of that…View On WordPress

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Look who’s walking! (Finally!) Last week, after a few months of practice, Heath decided to make the switch. So this past Saturday he got to get his first pair of shoes. 👟 Welcome to the world of bipedalism, kid. You’re looking good. (at Gorman Playground)

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This kid has been working really hard on learning how to walk. It’s taken him a while, but he’s finally getting the hang of it. Niagara Falls, Ontario, on Thursday, 23 February 2017 #latergram (at Niagara Falls)

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The Glass House Living room Dining room Looking out Stone wall New Canaan, Connecticut Thursday, 3 July 2014 Of Metro-North’s five lines — three east of the Hudson River, two west — only the New Haven Line, most of which hugs the north shore of Long Island Sound in Connecticut, has branches. Three, in fact, named after the towns in which they terminate: Danbury, Waterbury, and New Canaan, which is the shortest and westernmost. Unlike the terminuses of the other branches, where the poor economic fortunes of southwest Connecticut are more apparent, New Canaan is a picture-perfect New England town of charming buildings, quaint restaurants, and upscale shops. In the woods surrounding the town, low, hand-built fences of irregular stones divide lots and fields. One senses that perhaps time has stood still for a century or more in this little patch of Fairfield County. (And let’s be frank: one also senses that this place is rather WASP-y, where polo shirts in light colors with upturned collars and cable-knit sweaters folded around the shoulders are always in style. As long as they’re cream or navy blue, of course.) So it is perhaps surprising that in this setting is found one of the most innovative and celebrated houses constructed in the twentieth century. The renowned American architect Philip Johnson — the designer behind such New York City landmarks as the modernist Seagram Building and the postmodern AT&T Building (today known as the Sony Building) — chose this spot to build his own residence. The exterior walls, except for the steel columns that hold up the roof, are constructed entirely of large sheets of glass, and the single-room house is transparent except for a cylindrical brick bathroom near one corner of the house, giving the house its name: the Glass House. All tours start at the visitors center in central New Canaan, right across the street from the decidedly traditional train station, and the only way to access the property is via the visitors center’s shuttle bus. I decided to book the “Glass House + Galleries” tour, which included not only the house itself but several of the outbuildings on the property, including the underground Painting Gallery, the rather stunning Sculpture Gallery, and the gatehouse, called Da Monsta, which looks a bit like it was copied out of a Picasso painting. The house is a rather fascinating exercise in the organization of space, since it is all, except for that bathroom, a single room. Nonetheless, it has a clearly defined kitchen, dining room, living room, and bedroom. (Mr. Johnson himself referred to the separate areas as “rooms” and noted that the layout was no different from a house in, say, the colonial style.) Surrounded entirely by glass, I expected to feel too exposed while in the house, a bit like being on the beach without an umbrella. But the house actually feels rather private. It helps that the grounds are extensive, so the neighbors aren’t too close, and the completely transparent walls invite the outside into the house rather than turning the house inside out. Indeed, the National Trust for Historic Preservation notes that “The Glass House is best understood as a pavilion for viewing the surrounding landscape.” It also helps that the roof is opaque. The furniture — some of which was designed by pioneering modernist architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe — is, expectedly, simple, modern, and restrained. This is not a space for clutter. Beyond the furniture, there is no interior decor beyond a couple of plants, a freestanding sculpture, and a painting, supported of course on a stand, since there are no walls on which to hang. In all, the house 16.8 meters (55 feet) long, 10.1 meters (33 feet) wide, and 3.2 meters (10.5 feet) high. It was completed in 1949 and has remained virtually unchanged — and unaged — since. Mr. Johnson passed away in the house at age 98 on 25 January 2005, upon which ownership transferred to the National

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Memories with Fiona's friends (of the stuffed sort)

A quick note from Susan on a couple of memories with Fiona&rsquo;s stuffed animal friends.Peace with Peter Once, when Fiona was about two, she was having a meltdown and was so angry at Mama that she wouldn’t speak to her. So Mama picked up Peter (from The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats) and started talking to Fiona about what was bothering her. Fiona sat in Mama’s lap for a few minutes having a conversation with Peter. It really helped her calm down. Toddler politics? Around October…View On WordPress

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#latergram This handsome kid. ♥ 13 September 2016 (at Travers Park)

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I first wore this tie nearly nine years ago, on the day Susan and I got married. It’s seen a lot of use since then, and the time has come to retire it. I wore it one last time today, and now it’s going into the memory box. Now to find another silver tie. (at New York, New York)

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Sorting through photos and ran across this one of Heath that Susan took during our annual walk across Central Park on the day after Thanksgiving a couple of months ago. Friday, 25 November 2016 #latergram #CentralPark #NYC (at Central Park)

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Doodling while I was bored in a sacrament meeting back in 2007. It looks like the prediction wasn’t far off. #tbt (at Chevy Chase, Maryland)

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In some traditions yesterday was the twelfth day of Christmas and today is Epiphany or Three Kings’ Day — the official end of the Christmas season. Our family typically leaves our Christmas tree and decorations up until today. For the past month or so, Heath has really enjoyed swatting at these ornaments I hung in our doorways, so I had to give him one last go before I took them down to put in storage for eleven months. (at Jackson Hts, Queens)

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I missed the open house by 20 minutes. But I finally got to go inside this evening. (at Hartford Mormon Temple)

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New York City has waited for this subway line for nearly 100 years. Of course I’m here. #2ndAveSubway #🚇 #NYC #NYCsubway #Manhattan #transit #zoomzoom (at 96th Street (Second Avenue Subway))

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<img data-attachment-id="2415" data-permalink="http://dtjoyce.com/?attachment_id=2415" data-orig-file="https://dtjoyce.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/p3180085.jpg?w=4288&h=3216" data-orig-size="4288,3216" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta='{"aperture":"3.3","credit":"","camera":"SP-610UZ","caption":"OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA","created_timestamp":"1489848836","copyright":"","focal_length":"5","iso":"200","shutter_speed":"0.066666666666667","title":"OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA","orientation":"1"}' data-image-title="Mosaic station identification sign, South Ferry subway station, Manhattan (Heins & LaFarge, 1905)" data-image-description="<p>Photo by Dustin Tyler Joyce, 18 March 2017</p> " data-medium-file="https://dtjoyce.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/p3180085.jpg?w=4288&h=3216?w=300" data-large-file="https://dtjoyce.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/p3180085.jpg?w=4288&h=3216?w=960" class="alignnone size-full wp-image-2415" src="https://dtjoyce.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/p3180085.jpg?w=4288&h=3216" alt="Mosaic station identification sign, South Ferry subway station, Manhattan (Heins &amp; LaFarge, 1905)" width="4288" height="3216" srcset="https://dtjoyce.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/p3180085.jpg 4288w, https://dtjoyce.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/p3180085.jpg?w=150&h=113 150w, https://dtjoyce.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/p3180085.jpg?w=300&h=225 300w, https://dtjoyce.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/p3180085.jpg?w=768&h=576 768w, https://dtjoyce.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/p3180085.jpg?w=960&h=720 960w" sizes="(max-width: 4288px) 100vw, 4288px"> First, the backstory. On 16 March 2009, a new South Ferry subway station, the southernmost subway station in Manhattan, opened. The old South Ferry station, which originally opened over a century earlier in 1905, had served millions of commuters well, but it had always had its limitations. When the New York City Subway was originally built, local trains had only five cars, and so stations where only local trains stopped were built just long enough for five cars. This later proved insufficient, so local trains were extended, as were local stations — where possible. That’s the reason the beautiful original City Hall subway station was shuttered at the end of 1945, and it’s why the architecture and signage of some older subway stations abruptly changes partway along the platform. <img data-attachment-id="2411" data-permalink="http://dtjoyce.com/?attachment_id=2411" data-orig-file="https://dtjoyce.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/cityhallstation.jpg" data-orig-size="2794,1871" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta='{"aperture":"3.5","credit":"","camera":"NIKON D40X","caption":"","created_timestamp":"1285418748","copyright":"","focal_length":"18","iso":"0","shutter_speed":"0.066666666666667","title":"","orientation":"0"}' data-image-title="City Hall subway station" data-image-description="<p>Paul Lowry | 25 September 2010 | CC BY 2.0<br /> https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:CityHallStation.jpg</p> " data-medium-file="https://dtjoyce.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/cityhallstation.jpg?w=300&h=201" data-large-file="https://dtjoyce.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/cityhallstation.jpg?w=960" class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-2411" src="https://dtjoyce.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/cityhallstation.jpg?w=300&h=201" alt="City Hall subway station" width="300" height="201" srcset="https://dtjoyce.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/cityhallstation.jpg?w=300&h=201 300w, https://dtjoyce.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/cityhallstation.jpg?w=600&h=402 600w, https://dtjoyce.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/cityhallstation.jpg?w=150&h=100 150w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px">The City Hall subway station, which was closed at the end of 1945. (Photo by Paul Lowry via Wikimedia Commons, CC BY 2.0) The old South Ferry station, built as a loop where terminating downtown trains could turn around and return uptown — like the City Hall station — couldn’t be

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#TBT: The Palace of #Westminster and Westminster Bridge, 30 January 2015. #WeAreNotAfraid #London #LDN (at The Houses of Parliament)

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22 JANUARY 2011 Our family accompanied Boy Scouts from the Washington DC 3rd Ward on a visit to the Washington Monument. Fiona and Susan Susan and Fiona Fiona Fiona Fiona Fiona and Susan Fiona Looking up toward the tip of the monument. This is one of the red beacons that shine in pairs like sinister eyes from each of the monument’s four faces at night. Susan and Fiona Susan and Fiona Factoid: The Washington Monument Height: 555 feet, 51/8 inches (169.294 meters) Construction began 4 July 1848 and was completed 6 December 1884. The marble changes color 152 feet (46 meters) up because construction halted between 1858 and 1878 due to co-option by the Know Nothings, lack of funds, and the Civil War. When construction resumed, stone from the original quarry had run out and builders had to use stone of a slightly darker shade. The capstone is pure aluminum, which was as expensive as silver at the time. When completed, it was the world’s tallest structure, surpassing Cologne Cathedral in Germany. It was surpassed by the Eiffel Tower in 1889. It remains the world’s tallest stone structure. The view from the top This slideshow requires JavaScript. At the base Susan and Fiona Susan and Fiona with the United States Capitol in the background Susan and Fiona with the White House in the background Susan and Fiona with the Lincoln Memorial in the background A look back at our visit to the Washington Monument on 22 January 2011. 22 JANUARY 2011 Our family accompanied Boy Scouts from the Washington DC 3rd Ward on a visit to the Washington Monument.

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Rowhouses on Manhattan’s Upper West Side during this afternoon’s snowfall. West 69th Street between Columbus Avenue and Broadway (at Upper West Side)

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Dustin's Missionary Call Acceptance

My letter to the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints accepting my mission call.<img width="232" height="300" style="float: right; padding:10px;" src="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2000/11/missionary-call-acceptance-600-dpi-not-sharpened.jpg?w=232" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2000/11/missionary-call-acceptance-600-dpi-not-sharpened.jpg?w=232 232w, https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2000/11/missionary-call-acceptance-600-dpi-not-sharpened.jpg?w=464 464w, https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2000/11/missionary-call-acceptance-600-dpi-not-sharpened.jpg?w=116 116w" sizes="(max-width: 232px) 100vw, 232px" data-attachment-id="126540" data-permalink="http://dialann.org/?attachment_id=126540" data-orig-file="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2000/11/missionary-call-acceptance-600-dpi-not-sharpened.jpg" data-orig-size="5100,6600" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta='{"aperture":"0","credit":"","camera":"","caption":"","created_timestamp":"0","copyright":"","focal_length":"0","iso":"0","shutter_speed":"0","title":"","orientation":"1"}' data-image-title="Dustin’s Missionary Call Acceptance" data-image-description="<p>Those who receive calls to serve as full-time missionaries of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are asked to “send [their] written acceptance promptly, endorsed by [their] bishop.” A form is enclosed with the mission call that provides space for them to do so. This is Dustin’s completed Missionary Call Acceptance form, signed by his bishop. Harry E. Mahler of the Pineville Ward, Charlotte North Carolina South Stake.</p> " data-medium-file="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2000/11/missionary-call-acceptance-600-dpi-not-sharpened.jpg?w=232" data-large-file="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2000/11/missionary-call-acceptance-600-dpi-not-sharpened.jpg?w=791"> [7 November 2000] Dear Brethren: I humbly accept the Lord’s call to serve in the Utah Salt Lake City South Mission. In the time since I received my call, one thought has predominated my emotions. So often we work up an idea about what would be best for ourselves. So often what the Lord gives us is something totally different. But always, the blessings we receive from what the Lord gives us are far View On WordPress

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Ten years ago, I spent a summer studying in a picturesque French city, exploring châteaux, and eating pains au chocolat. But what really made it the best summer ever was establishing enduring friendships. An opportunity & an arrival <img data-attachment-id="126379" data-permalink="http://dialann.org/?attachment_id=126379" data-orig-file="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/2004-05-30-institut-de-tourraine.jpg" data-orig-size="1024,1280" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta='{"aperture":"0","credit":"","camera":"","caption":"Camera","created_timestamp":"0","copyright":"","focal_length":"0","iso":"0","shutter_speed":"0","title":"Camera","orientation":"0"}' data-image-title="Institut de Touraine" data-image-description="<p>Dustin | 30 May 2004</p> " data-medium-file="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/2004-05-30-institut-de-tourraine.jpg?w=240&h=300" data-large-file="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/2004-05-30-institut-de-tourraine.jpg?w=819" class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-126379" src="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/2004-05-30-institut-de-tourraine.jpg?w=240&h=300" alt="Institut de Tourraine, Tours, France" width="240" height="300" srcset="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/2004-05-30-institut-de-tourraine.jpg?w=240&h=300 240w, https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/2004-05-30-institut-de-tourraine.jpg?w=480&h=600 480w, https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/2004-05-30-institut-de-tourraine.jpg?w=120&h=150 120w" sizes="(max-width: 240px) 100vw, 240px">The façade of the Hôtel Torterue at 1 rue de la Grandière in Tours. This bourgeois mansion, built in 1862, houses the Institut de Touraine, where Dustin studied French with a group of students from the University of Utah in June 2004. After studying French in seventh and eighth grades and all through high school, I continued my studies in French at the University of Utah, where I even declared it a second major alongside urban planning. But in all those years of learning French I had never spent any time in a French-speaking place, aside from a four-day, three-night trip to Québec with my French class in eighth grade. When I found out that the U took a group of students to France each summer, I was quick to sign up. When my first year at the University of Utah ended, I flew home to North Carolina to visit my family. From there I was off to London Gatwick. My friends Emily, Rhiannon, and Trina had had a new roommate that spring semester, Jennifer, who was an exchange student from the United Kingdom. Even though she attended the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, she was from Berkshire, just outside London, and she had an uncle and two cousins who lived in Crawley, near Gatwick. Her uncle, in fact, worked for British Airways at Gatwick Airport. I stayed at their place for a night before continuing on to France. One of the University of Utah staff members who helped organize that summer’s program had warned us before departure that the French tend to dress better than Americans do and that we would be wise to step up our game. (In hindsight, I can’t say I agree with this; perhaps the French have been too influenced by American styles and informality. But what did I know at the time?) So I got up that morning and put on a nice black suit with a blue shirt, which I wore unbuttoned at the top without a tie. I figured that would make me presentable enough when I arrived in Paris. I wasn’t thinking, however, that it would make me really hot and sweaty, even in the relative cool of an early summer British morning. I also wasn’t thinking when I packed a very large suitcase, along with a carryon and an over-the-shoulder case with a laptop. I realized my mistake on my way to Waterloo International from Crawley, when I had to change trains at Clapham Junction. It involved switching platforms — and there was no elevator. That was a struggle up and down the stairs. I was s

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I love how curious this guy is about the world around him and how hard he works to learn new things. Last Sunday, 19 February 2017 #latergram (at Irvine Nature Center)

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An early testimony of prayer

Fiona was having a hard time sleeping without her pacifier. So she prayed and found the help she needed.On Sunday, 1 June 2014, Fiona (almost) bore her testimony in sacrament meeting for the first time. On the bus on the way to church, she told me a story about what had happened the night before, when she had been trying to fall asleep in the loft bed without her pacifier (it’s about time to give up her “pacifizer,” as she calls it, so she was trying it out). Her story went like this: “I was having…View On WordPress

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Do not think that just because we live in one of the biggest cities in the world we never see nature in action. Just a few moments ago as I was putting Colin and Heath down for a nap, I went to close the curtains in their room and noticed a flurry of feathers falling toward the ground. As I looked closer across the alley I saw this hawk going to town on what looked like a pigeon, possibly caught in midair. I told Colin that he should come look. We went into the kitchen and opened the window to get a clearer view. I think the hawk may have known it was being watched because it hardly did anything as we were watching. But then I put Colin back in bed and watched quietly from another window, where I took this photo as I listened to it eat its meal. Snap, snap, snap, and more feathers and a claw swallowed whole — the hawk is still out there finishing it off. (at Jackson Heights, New York)

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#latergram This guy on his first birthday. 12 September 2016 (at Queens Zoo)

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Looking to do some self-publishing? Here’s a Blurb discount for you

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If you're looking to do some self-publishing, I highly recommend Blurb. And if you're new to Blurb, I have a referral code to share with you.

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I’m out here early enough that the floodlights are still shining on this thing. #🏃 (at Flushing Meadows - Corona Park)

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The internet, it turns out, needs more photos of this guy, so I am obliging. (at Jackson Heights, New York)

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See-through rail map on Baltimore’s subway. (at Owings Mills Metro Station)

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🍦🍧🍨 I just happened to be passing by, so I had to stop for the factory tour. (I had certainly not planned to take the route that goes past it. No, of course not.) (at Ben And Jerry’s Factory)

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A video posted by Dustin Tyler Joyce (@dtjoyce) on Dec 26, 2016 at 7:25am PST Out of the tunnel and into Harlem. (at Harlem – 125th Street (Metro-North station))

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As we were cleaning their room, Colin decided it would be great to climb into the bin and THEN have all the blocks piled in. (at Jackson Hts, Queens)

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Checking out the old South Ferry station before it closes forever

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The original 1905 South Ferry station was reopened in 2013 after hurricane Sandy's storm surge devastated the new South Ferry station. I went to check out the old station before it closes — possibly forever — in the coming months.

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Baton Rouge, Louisiana On Tuesday, 19 April 2011, during our spring-break trip to the Deep South, we took a daytrip from New Orleans to Baton Rouge, Louisiana’s capital. The primary purpose of this excursion, of course, was to see the state capitol—the 28th in my quest to visit all 50. That evening, after our visit to the capitol, Susan and I also attended the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple. The skyscraper form of the Louisiana capitol is a unique feature shared by only two other state houses, those of Nebraska and North Dakota. (Nebraska’s capitol was, in fact, the inspiration for Louisiana’s.) The building was conceived in 1928—the height of the Roaring Twenties just before the start of the Great Depression—during the successful gubernatorial campaign of Huey Long. The illustrious Mr. Long was one of America’s most colorful political figures. He wanted a beautiful, modern building that spoke of what Louisiana was and aspired to be—a modern, powerful, prosperous state. It’s probably also fair to say that he wanted a permanent public work that matched his own ego. Ironically, Mr. Long never occupied the governor’s office in the capitol whose construction he championed. He was elected to the United States Senate in 1931, shortly before the dedication of the capitol on 16 May 1932. In a strange twist of fate, Mr. Long was assassinated in the corridor outside the governor’s office on 10 September 1935. In the end, however, I think Mr. Long got in this building what he wanted. The Louisiana State Capitol is one of the best examples of 1920s art deco in the world, and among all the state capitols I’ve been to, it certainly ranks among the most beautiful. This bronze relief map of Louisiana rests in the center of the lobby’s floor. It displays the state’s major products and is encircled with the names of Louisiana’s 64 parishes. (Counties in Louisiana are called “parishes.”) The Senate chamber Fiona and Dustin in the House chamber The House chamber Fiona on the observation deck. It was really windy when we were up there. Fiona loved it. View of the capitol grounds and downtown Baton Rouge from the observation deck. Notice the Mississippi River in the upper right. The capitol grounds and downtown Baton Rouge seen from the front steps of the capitol. Forty-nine steps lead to the capitol’s entrance. The names of the states are inscribed on the steps in the order in which they joined the Union. The top step is inscribed with E pluribus unum, flanked by Alaska and Hawai‘i, which were admitted to the Union in 1959, more than two decades after the capitol was completed. The flags that hang from the balcony above the elevators include those of the various nations that have ruled Louisiana throughout its history: Castile and Leon; France, with both the flag of Bourbon France and the modern French tricolor; Bourbon Spain; the United Kingdom; the Republic of West Florida; the Louisiana national flag; the third national flag of the Confederate States of America; Louisiana’s modern state flag; and the United States of America, with both a 15-star flag and the modern flag. Lobby The entrance hall to the capitol from a balcony overlooking the lobby. Susan and Fiona at the Louisiana State Capitol The capitol’s dramatic front entrance Huey Long, who was governor of Louisiana from 1928 to 1932 and championed the construction of the capitol, is buried in the center of the grounds in front of the building. This monument marks his grave. The seat of Louisiana’s state government is one of the best examples of art deco in the world. Baton Rouge, Louisiana On Tuesday, 19 April 2011, during our spring-break trip to the Deep South, we took a daytrip from New Orleans to Baton Rouge, Louisiana’s capital.

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Dustin Tyler Joyce

30 OCTOBER 2010 Our family joined an estimated 215,000 people for Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert’s rally on the Mall. In our family, we like to talk about politics. However, we have yet to find a single politician or pundit with whom we agree all, or even most, of the time. In the last year or so, many Americans seem to have taken politics too seriously and taken their own positions too far. The Tea Party movement, which originally focused on the idea that the federal government was taxing us too much in order to do things that are not allowed by the Constitution, has gotten a little out of hand. Some members are “birthers,” claiming that Barack Obama is not a natural-born U.S. citizen. Some liken him to Hitler. Some hold up signs with messages to the government: “Get your hands off my Medicare.” Some became convinced that the health insurance bill passed last year involves death panels which will decide when Grandma has to die. Glenn Beck, a commentator on Fox News who is popular among Tea Partiers, had a rally on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, “coincidentally” on the anniversary of Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech in the same location. It was not exactly nonpartisan, nor was the ensuing debate over the number of attendees. Things were pretty vitriolic for a while. Then Jon Stewart—the “news” anchor on Comedy Central—announced that he would be having a “Rally to Restore Sanity” on the National Mall the day before Halloween. Immediately afterwards, Stephen Colbert—the “conservative commentator” on Comedy Central—announced that he would stage a competing rally called the “March to Keep Fear Alive.” He estimated attendance would be around 400 million. We could not pass up such a historic event, so we rescheduled our trip to Fredericksburg. Dustin prepared some protest signs for Fiona, based loosely on some ridiculous Tea Party signs we had seen as well as some 2008 campaign slogans. We woke up that Saturday and got ready, then met our friend Yándary to head down to the rally (the two had been combined into a single event). We didn’t think we would need to leave that early, because surely there wouldn’t be that many out-of-town visitors for a rally that was just a joke. Yándary met us at our apartment, Fiona climbed into her baby carrier, and we set off. We waited at our usual bus stop as several buses—completely full—went by. Finally, we decided that perhaps we should try the subway, which might be less crowded. The inbound trains were just as packed as the buses, so we took an outbound train up a few stops to Fort Totten where the crowds were lighter, crossed the platform, and then got on an inbound train to downtown. It was still crowded, but at least we were able to get on an inbound train. Once we got downtown, we made our way to the Mall. Posters—funny, ironic, lackadaisical, nonsensical—were everywhere, and many people were also wearing their Halloween costumes. We even saw “Bill” from “I’m Just a Bill,” but unfortunately, we were not able to get a picture with him. Our main goal was to see what other people had done to make fun of real ralliers. Most of the crowd seemed to have the same idea. Thousands of people milled around the Mall, taking pictures of others’ signs. Fiona was a huge hit. Everyone who walked by cooed at her, laughed at her signs, and/or asked to take pictures. We wish there were a way to search the Internet for her face, because we’re pretty sure there are hundreds of pictures of her posted on blogs. This slideshow requires JavaScript. The rally was intended to get people to lighten up. Some protesters seemed to have missed that memo, and had made posters with serious statements on them. We groaned every time we walked by them. In the end, you could say we didn’t even attend the rally, since we never saw the stage or heard Jon Stewart or Stephen Colbert. But, in our opinion, we were there for the important part: making fun of people who take things too seriously. Dustin and Fio

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Dustin Tyler Joyce

'To every thing there is a season'

Susan gave a talk in church yesterday. Here&rsquo;s what she had to say.As Latter-day Saints, a lot is expected of us. But, as King Benjamin reminded his people, everything should be “done in wisdom and order.” The Lord doesn’t expect us to “run faster than [we have] strength” — counsel each of us should remember as we prioritize what is most important in our lives. I think I will feel a little awkward giving this particular talk after hearing those testimonies…View On WordPress

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Dustin's mission call

The full text of my mission call, with a high-resolution scan.<img width="231" height="300" style="float: right; padding:10px;" src="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/dustins-mission-call.png?w=231" class="attachment-medium size-medium wp-post-image" alt="" srcset="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/dustins-mission-call.png?w=231 231w, https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/dustins-mission-call.png?w=462 462w, https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/dustins-mission-call.png?w=116 116w" sizes="(max-width: 231px) 100vw, 231px" data-attachment-id="126493" data-permalink="http://dialann.org/?attachment_id=126493" data-orig-file="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/dustins-mission-call.png" data-orig-size="2528,3278" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta='{"aperture":"0","credit":"","camera":"","caption":"","created_timestamp":"0","copyright":"","focal_length":"0","iso":"0","shutter_speed":"0","title":"","orientation":"0"}' data-image-title="Dustin’s mission call" data-image-description="<p>The letter Dustin received calling him to serve as a full-time missionary of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the Utah Salt Lake City South Mission. The letter is dated 31 October 2000 and is signed by then–church president Gordon B. Hinckley (1910–2008).</p> " data-medium-file="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/dustins-mission-call.png?w=231" data-large-file="https://dialannmag.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/dustins-mission-call.png?w=790">The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints OFFICE OF THE FIRST PRESIDENCY 47 East South Temple Street, Salt Lake City, Utah 84150-1000 31 October 2000 Elder Dustin Tyler Joyce 1319 Copper Creek Ln. Fort Mill, South Carolina 29715-7059 Dear Elder Joyce: You are hereby called to serve as a missionary of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. You are assigned to labor in the Utah…View On WordPress

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Fiona really enjoyed going to the top of the Hill Cumorah — so much so that she asked me (asked me! rather than avoid the camera with a sour look on her face) to take several photos of her with the Angel Moroni monument. Hill Cumorah near Palmyra, New York, Friday, 24 February 2017 #latergram (at Cumorah)

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It happened here. “… I saw a pillar of light exactly over my head, above the brightness of the sun, which descended gradually until it fell upon me. "… When the light rested upon me I saw two Personages, whose brightness and glory defy all description, standing above me in the air. One of them spake unto me, calling me by name and said, pointing to the other—This is My Beloved Son. Hear Him!” (Joseph Smith—History 1:16–17) We took Fiona, Colin, and Heath to visit the Sacred Grove near Palmyra, New York, on Friday, 24 February 2017, on our way home from Niagara Falls. #latergram (at The Sacred Grove)

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This kid is 17 months of awesome today. Here he is on his first birthday back in September. 🎂🎈🎉

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❄☕🏠 Days like this — warm and cozy inside, hot chocolate in a mug, snow gently falling and no one freaking out about it — remind me why I’m grateful to live in the Northeast. (at Jackson Heights, New York)

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20 January 2009 Eight years ago it was a very different Inauguration Day, and I was there. (at United States Capitol)

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The Sunday School lesson I taught today was about the First Vision and the historical events leading up to the Restoration. I noted that the process began long before this theophany in 1820. I highlighted in particular the role of Magna Carta (1215), Martin Luther’s 95 Theses (1517), and the founding of the United States (1776–1791) in setting the stage — that Reformation, Renaissance, and revolution (American, French, scientific, Industrial) led to Restoration. I really like this painting depicting the First Vision that is in the inside back cover of the Ensign this month. I displayed it for my class as we discussed Joseph Smith—History 1:16–17: “I saw a pillar of light exactly over my head, above the brightness of the sun, which descended gradually until it fell upon me. … When the light rested upon me I saw two Personages, whose brightness and glory defy all description, standing above me in the air. One of them spake unto me, calling me by name and said, pointing to the other—This is My Beloved Son. Hear Him!” Detail of The First Vision by Jorge Cocco Santángelo (2016)

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This is not an especially well-known building, but it is one of my favorites in New York. It is such an outstanding example of art deco and the setbacks required by the 1916 zoning code and it just looks stunning as you come up out of the subway at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street. (at 500 Fifth Avenue)

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IT’S HERE!!! “This is a 96th Street/Second Avenue–bound Q express train via the Second Avenue Line.” New York City’s biggest subway extension in over half a century opened at noon today. #2ndAveSubway (at 96th Street (Second Avenue Subway))

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This is the floor of the children’s room in the public library in Derby, Vermont — which is also the public library in Stanstead, Québec. The black line is the border between the two countries. My left foot is in the United States while my right foot is in Canada. 🗽|🍁 (at Haskell Free Library)

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Just barely missed a train. At least I have a decent place to wait for the next one. #NYC #🗽 #🚄 #GCT #GrandCentral (at Grand Central Terminal)

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