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A post shared by Thepurplelilac (@thepurplelilac) on May 20, 2017 at 8:41pm PDT Had a #wonderful day with my kids today @harbourfrontto. Enjoyed the #cool weather @waterfrontto and attended the kids circus ♡ So much fun The #circus has two more days to go so if you live in #Toronto give it a visit! #harbourfront #waterfront #instadaily #instacool #instagood #lakeontario

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What a great day for #books readers and writers!! The festival of trees was a great success! We all enjoyed reading and buying all the books plus meeting all the great writers. Although many were great, the best non-fiction #science #book today from my view was @ProfAstroCat @DominicWalliman #ForestofReading #FestivalofTrees #Toronto @ForestofReading #sciwri I also liked the Silver Birch Non-Fiction honour book #2:Friend or Foe by Etta Kaner & @andillustration @owlkids Can’t wait to attend next year :)

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Cute little #cactus Sold out but you can always #order it online at my #etsy shop #Amigurumi #crochet #handmade https://t.co/T90CHqCKvo

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Made my first #Korok plushie over the long weekend. So in love with this cutie♡♡♡ #zeldabreathofthewild #zelda #breathofthewild #nintendo #zeldafans #felt #handmade #crafts #etsy #etsyfeature #etsyfind #etsyca #plushie

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Motivating myself this Monday through looking back at my #Master thesis!! At that time I also wondered how I will write, defend and pass the hard time?!! But I did it. And now after almost 5 years I’m trying to encourage and inspire myself to hold tight and move on…… #mondaymotivation

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Today was a great day for blindness and vision research.The Department of Ophthalmology and vision Sciences held its 59 Annual Research Day @UofT. Many physicians/researchers met to exchange knowledge and share recent updates about blindness treatment and eye diseases. Keynote lecture was given by Dr. Friedrich Kruse titled" New insight in the concept of limbal stem cells for ocular surface reconstruction". Unlike retinal stem cells, limbal stem cells (reside in an area called: the limbus located between the cornea and conjectiva). These cells can regenerate new corneal tissue after chemical or thermal eye injury but sadly their survival is low in vitro. Researchers were looking for the cause and it turned out that the niche factors played a big role. The cellular component of the niche including melanocytes and mesenchymal stem cells had the upper hand in keeping these #stemcells alive, maintaing their stemness and reducing the inflammation associated with the injury through secreting cytokines and tranfering material and pigment to inside the stem cells through a process called “endocytosis”. Also the extracelluar matrix including laminin and integrin isoforms showed to play an important role in adhesion and migration of these stem cells. So scientists are taking limbal stem cells and growing them in vitro either from the contralateral eye or from the bucal mucosa along with melanocytes and MSCs and then put the proliferating colones on carriers made up from laminin or integrin then transplant them to the affected eye. The average recovery rate from this procedure was 50-70 % and long term follow up showed a promising results. #vision #blindness #researchday #ophthalmology

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A post shared by Thepurplelilac (@thepurplelilac) on May 15, 2017 at 7:49am PDT New #Monday new #experiment!

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I want to get into this ship and travel far far away from this land …… Exploring new places and many happy faces …… Just feeling down, bad mood, hard days went and coming, tired and losing motivation in everything!!! Sorry for the depressive mode this late night! Take care all …. keep sharing my posts if you like them but don’t unfollow …..

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Yesterday I went to check up my #visualacuity and my #retina (see my retinal image above) because I had hard time looking at the microscope lately and thought I need to see what’s going on inside my #eyes!! But how frequently should you have your eyes examined? #Kids should have their first eye exam at 6 months of age, another exam at age three and again at the start of school. Risk-free children should continue to do the examination every two years until age 18. #Children with risk factors for vision problems may need their first eye exam earlier than 6 months of age and may need more frequent eye exams throughout childhood. Examples of risk factors include: * History of premature birth or low birth weight. * Infection of mother during pregnancy (examples: rubella, venereal disease, herpes, AIDS). * Developmental delays Turned or crossed eyes (strabismus). * Family history of eye disease. * High refractive error or anisometropia Other physical illness or disease. For adults: every two years for adults ages 18 to 60, and annual exams for seniors age 61 and older. Adultvwith risks should havecmore frequent visits. Risk factors for adults include: * A family history of eye disease ( #glaucoma, #maculardegeneration, etc.) * #Diabetes or high #bloodpressure * A visually demanding occupation or one that may pose hazards to the eyes * Taking prescription or non-prescription drugs that may have visual or eye-related side effects * Previous eye injuries or eye #surgery. Take care of your eyes and do schedualed examination to detect eye problems early before it is too late. Retinal stem cells in your eye can’t regenerate to replace lost tissue. The only clinically approved stem cell treatment is used to regenerate your Cornea and it is called limbal stem cells. Otherwise, most the studies are still in clinical trial phase and nothing yet approved.

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